L’s Story

I would like to share my story, in order to highlight the harm that I believe is caused by SSRI and SNRI antidepressants.

In 2008 I suffered the horrendous experience of a depressive psychosis. It was diagnosed by psychiatry as “postnatal psychosis”. I now have a strong suspicion that my psychosis was caused by an SSRI and an SNRI.

My first daughter was born in April 2008. I took citalopram at a steady dose for about 2 years prior to the birth and throughout my pregnancy. In the days after she was born, I read that sertraline was the safest SSRI to take while breastfeeding. I asked the GP about it and she changed me from citalopram to sertraline. In the following weeks I became very depressed. I was changed back to citalopram and the dose was increased. In the weeks following this I became suicidally depressed and developed a florid depressive psychosis. I made several suicide attempts and was sectioned. I continued on citalopram and olanzapine was added. I did not respond quickly to the meds so was given ECT. I had a fairly rapid improvement following ECT and was allowed home. However, after a few months my depressive psychosis returned. I was changed to venlafaxine and quetiapine and after 3 months the depressive psychosis lifted and I remained well until two years after the birth of my second daughter in 2012. I was advised to take quetiapine for some months after this birth. I remained well for 2 years, however, when no longer on quetiapine, I had another episode of depressive psychosis. I remained on venlafaxine but this time quetiapine was not effective. My antipsychotic was changed to amisulpride and after 3 months I recovered. I have remained on a low dose of amisulpride and have not experienced psychosis since then. I now wonder about the possibility that I have a sensitivity to SSRIs/SNRIs and that my episodes of psychosis were actually caused by citalopram/venlafaxine and that the psychosis was only subdued by the addition of an antipsychotic.

I was told on a number of occasions by the psychiatry team that my illness was “atypical”. I do not remember any of the psychiatry team ever mentioning the possibility that my depressive psychosis may have been caused by the SSRI or SNRI – it was always attributed to an underlying illness – “postnatal psychosis” or “psychotic depression”. This has led me to wonder how many other cases of worsened depression and psychosis may be influenced by these drugs, which is why I want to highlight the issue. If psychiatry is not considering this possibility, this potential cause will not be being reported and it could be going unnoticed, meaning it is possible that, like me, some people are advised to continue on the drugs that precipitated their illness in the first place, with further drugs being added to counteract the negative effects of the SSRI/SNRI.

I would also like to highlight the problems I have had attempting to withdraw from venlafaxine. In discussion with my psychiatrist, I decided to come off venlafaxine in 2015, having been well for over 2 years. My psychiatrist recommended a taper which I now believe was way too fast – over several weeks. The withdrawal during those weeks was a truly awful experience. For the whole period of withdrawal and several weeks afterwards, I felt like I had a severe bout of the flu and a terrible hangover. I had electric shock sensations in my head. It felt as if my brain was being constantly irritated by a chemical. I felt agitated and intensely irritable. I felt an intense burning sensation in my head, spine and oesophagus. My body ached all over. I had abdominal pain. I lost my senses of taste and smell. Then approximately 3 months after stopping venlafaxine, I became depressed. I completely lost my appetite and felt a physical sensation of my body and mind being an empty shell, unlike anything I had ever experienced. I was admitted to a psychiatric unit. My bowel stopped working. I was put back on venlafaxine and after approximately 4 months I fairly suddenly started to feel better again. The physical symptoms disappeared. The psychiatry team were convinced the whole episode was caused by my underlying illness – “psychotic depression”, because my depression could not be controlled without venlafaxine. However, I strongly suspect that what I experienced was a very bad case of withdrawal from venlafaxine.

Recently I decided I would like to try to withdraw from venlafaxine again, but this time much, much more slowly. I found a Facebook group dedicated to venlafaxine withdrawal. It has approximately 3800 members. Time and time again people report that they were not warned about the difficulties that many people have withdrawing from venlafaxine – indeed most medical professionals seem completely unaware of the problem that so many of us experience. The recommended taper advised in the group is a maximum of 10% of the dose at a time, with a hold of at least 30 days or until all withdrawal symptoms have resolved, before tapering again. For many of us, particularly those of us who have been taking it for a number of years, it would seem that to have the best chance of getting off venlafaxine and staying well we must reduce the dose very gradually over years. There are members of the group who, like me, came off much more quickly on the advice of their psychiatrist/GP, did not reinstate the drug quickly enough and who have suffered a protracted withdrawal over years, with a whole host of symptoms. I can’t help but feel that if there could be a much greater understanding of antidepressant withdrawal amongst medical professionals, including revised guidelines for withdrawal in the community, then more of us would receive the support we need to come off venlafaxine and other psychiatric drugs, rather than suffering intense withdrawal symptoms and being told that they are nothing to do with withdrawal but are the return of our original illness.

I find it very interesting in relation to my suspicion that I experienced SSRI induced psychosis that, since reducing my venlafaxine dose from 150mg to 100mg, my thoughts seem less distorted and obsessive, I have less anxiety and my thinking is much clearer.

Thank you for taking the time to read my story.

L… G….

Aled Jones (Communication & I.T)

Aled Jones

aledjones@past.wales

 

Aled’s background is in people, IT, adult support and of late – working and volunteering with recovery services in Cardiff and the Vale.

A crippling arthritic condition placed him on high strength opiate painkillers for many months whilst awaiting consultancy, the efficacy of them waning – requiring stronger doses giving him concerns of dependency.

Using the experience of a couple of decades of support and IT he helped set up PAST.Wales to help bring support to others with concerns in their prescription, over-the-counter (OTC) and online usage.

With qualifications and training in Health & Social Care, POVA , Medication, Novel Psychoactive Substance, Substance Misuse Awareness, Equality & Diversity and Business Management he uses his range of skills to assist PAST.Wales become a dynamic organisation.

 

 

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We run a completely confidential support service, NO we don’t have any connection or communication with GP surgery’s regarding prescriptions.
So you can rest assured that reaching out to us will not effect your prescription.
PAST. Wales.

NHS ‘creating drug addicts’ as figures show surge in prescriptions for powerful opioid painkillers

he number of prescriptions for powerful painkillers in England has nearly doubled in 10 years, it has been reported.

The surge in people taking opioids such as morphine has prompted doctors to warn that people are becoming addicted in greater numbers.

The family of drugs also includes codeine, tramadol and fentanyl, which is many times stronger.

According to the BBC, some 28.3 million opioids were prescribed by GPs in 2017, the equivalent of 2,700 packs an hour.

The figure is around 10 million more than the number of opioid prescriptions in 2007.

Opioids are prescribed to treat severe pain only after consultation with a GP or a pain specialist.

Full article – https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/03/16/nhs-creating-drug-addicts-figures-show-surge-prescriptions-powerful/

1 in 7

On the 9th May 2018 Michelle Ballantyne, MSP, raised the important issue of antidepressant overuse in the Scottish Parliament:

This was the first part of the response made by the Minister for Mental Health:

As an NHS doctor who has worked as a psychiatrist  in Scotland for over 25 years I am not reassured by this response by the Minister for Mental Health. I have highlighted three aspects of this response which I wish to briefly consider:

CLINICAL DECISION:
I agree that prescribing should follow the principles of  informed consent and shared decision making.  However informed consent will not be possible if the information that doctors base prescribing on follows marketing and promotion rather than independent, and more objective, continuing medical education.  The Scottish Government has consulted the public on the need for mandatory declarations of financial competing interests for doctors and academics in an open, central register. The public made it clear that this was what they felt was necessary. More than two years on from this consultation and there is no such system ensuring the transparency that is necessary for informed decision making between clinician and patient.

GOOD EVIDENCE:
Where is the “Good Evidence” to support the prescribing of antidepressants to 1 in 7 Scots, a significant proportion of whom are taking antidepressants long term or indefinitely? I have, like others, asked the Scottish Government to provide this “good evidence” but have been provided with no evidence to support such mass prescribing of  long term antidepressants.

APPROPRIATELY:
Currently there is a petition being considered by the Scottish Parliament in relation to potential problems with prescribed medications. This has highlighted that an important aspect which should determine the “appropriateness” of prescribing, namely the experience of people who are taking medications, has not been given the weight that it should.

Full Article

Antidepressants (Overuse)

Xanax WARNING: New prescription drugs craze is a deadly game of roulette

THE terrifying lottery facing thrill-seeking teenagers who buy the prescription drug Xanax online is today exposed by the Daily Express. Our investigation highlights the potentially deadly risk youngsters face when trying to obtain the highly addictive anti-anxiety medication for recreational use.

One site offering Xanax for sale in fact supplied us with Tramadol, an equally controversial opiate painkiller linked to hundreds of deaths.

MP Bambos Charalambous said: “These young people don’t know what they are putting into their bodies. They have no control at all.”

Rick Bradley, of the anti-abuse charity Addaction, said: “Purchases are either on the clean [legitimate] or the dark web or on the street. “The clean web is safer because it will be dispensed with information which might enable the user to take the drug more safely.”

Mr Bradley, who also sits on a new substances watchdog for Public Health England, added: “But that doesn’t make it safe at all.”

 

MJG’s experience

I started taking Klonopin 15 years ago for anxiety which I’ve had all my life. After taking multiple other medications that didn’t work for very long or they caused more anxiety I thought I had finally found the answer in Klonopin. At one time I was up to 3mg a day, this was many years ago and I got myself down to 1.5mg which worked well for about 9 years then it started causing anxiety attacks and constantly crying.

I had a doctor label me as benzo dependent which made me furious. To me he was saying I’m a drug addict. After a lot of thought I realized I am dependent on this! So I started my journey tapering off. At first I was cutting my pills, things seemed ok for a week or two until the withdrawals began. My body temperature isn’t regulated, I’m constantly sweating or freezing. My thoughts are all over the place and I can’t remember anything half the time. I have muscle cramps, heart palpitations, headaches, stomach pain, sleep to much or none at all. I wake up on a panic since my cortisol level is all over the place.

My brain and body are trying to heal from Klonopin leaving me feeling absolutely insane half the time. On good days I can function and feel great other days I can’t do anything but pace. My vision is blurred and I can’t tell how far things are so my perception is also messed up. I have vertigo causing the world to move around me but I’m still which makes me nauseous. This makes driving and even walking very hard. My ears ring so loud I can’t hear anything but the buzzing noise in my head so I have the tv or radio on at all times just to try to drowned out the buzzing but noise is like a ice pick to my brain. Some days I get a glimpse of myself and that keeps me going other days I don’t know who I am. I have fits of rage and I know that’s not me it’s just my brain trying to figure things out. I’m not done tapering yet I still have .26mg to go. Nobody understands if they haven’t been through this so I’m very thankful for the online support group I joined. Doctors don’t realize the horror of coming off klonopin so like many I’m doing this on my own.

I’ve been to the doctor many times for physical issues and after tests it’s proven I’m fine so I keep pushing along to get off this horrible medication. I don’t understand how a medication that can cause so much pain and distress can be prescribed! Especially long term. There are no real support groups for this and it’s much needed. Problem is many of us can’t leave the house but I’m sure a virtual session would be packed with people looking for help and answers.

Desperate for help: prescription drug addicts turn to the web

Lack of government-funded services means growing numbers have nowhere else to turn.

Thousands of people dependent on prescription drugs are desperately turning to online help groups and calling up charity helplines because of a lack of government-funded services.

A growing number of people struggling with addiction to painkillers, benzodiazepines and antidepressants are guiding each other through the process of withdrawal on Facebook groups and websites. They say they have nowhere else to turn.

The Guardian has also heard that people are resorting to calling up the Samaritans helpline, set up for those needing emotional support.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/feb/06/desperate-for-help-prescription-drug-addicts-turn-to-the-web